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Winter Frost (Jack Frost Series)


Jack Frost is a personification of frost, ice, snow, sleet, winter, and freezing cold. He is a variant of Old Man Winter who is held responsible for frosty weather, nipping the fingers and toes in such weather, coloring the foliage in autumn, and leaving fern-like patterns on cold windows in winter.




Winter Frost (Jack Frost series)



Jack Frost is traditionally said to leave the frosty, fern-like patterns on windows on cold winter mornings (window frost or fern frost) and nipping the extremities in cold weather. Over time, window frost has become far less prevalent in the modern world due to the advance of double-glazing, but Jack Frost remains a well-known figure in popular culture. He is sometimes described or depicted with paint brush and bucket coloring the autumnal foliage red, yellow, brown, and orange.[1]


His clothing is a blue hooded sweater, frost collecting around the ring of the collar, and wore the same trousers bound with lighter material starting from the knee down to the rather tattered and frayed bottom, and is barefoot throughout the movie. When he first awoke as Jack Frost, he was wearing the exact same outfit that he died in.


As the Spirit of Winter, Jack can summon snow, ice, frost, and later learned he can unleash energy bolts of ice, and he can easily freeze things over/solid with a mere wave of his staff. Originally, Jack channeled his Winter Magic through his staff, mistaking it to be the source of his power, when really it was just a conduit to help keep his powers under control. Jack can conjure ice, snow, and frost from his mere presence, as well as freezing winds, snowballs, snowflakes, etc.


Jack is immortal and has the power of winter, which he channels through his staff. He can use this to generate frost on objects by touching them, create and manipulate ice and snow, and send out freezing energy blasts. Jack can also manipulate cold winds, which enables him to fly, and enchant his snow so that it makes anyone it touches be instilled with a high sense of fun.


As the Spirit of Winter, Jack commands snow, ice, frost, and later learned he can unleash energy bolts of ice, and he can easily freeze things over/solid with a mere wave of his staff. Originally, Jack channeled his Winter Magic through his staff, mistaking it to be the source of his power, when really it was just a conduit. Jack can conjure ice, snow, and frost from his mere presence, as well as freezing winds, snowballs, snowflakes, etc. Jack can even manifest images from frosted window panes, freeze water by walking on it, and conjure indoor snowfall, and of course, being the spirit of winter, he is not bothered by the cold.


Jack has the appearance of a teenager and is considered good looking. He has silvery-white hair in spikes, but has black eyebrows and striking blue eyes. His skin is very pale but has somewhat of a blush to it. Tooth and her mini-fairies are considered to have a crush on him because of his good looks and teeth that "sparkle like freshly fallen snow". He wears a blue hoodie with frost designs and brown pants. He is always barefoot. Before Jack became Jack Frost he wore a brown cloak, a white woolen shirt and brown open vest with four buttons on the right arm side. He also wore the same brown pants.


Jack Frost is a personification of winter, and particularly the autumn and winter frosts, ice, and feel of cold in the air. The figure or equivalent winter representations, under different names, originate primarily from the Scandinavian Peninsula and other cold regions of Europe, collected in the Finnish epic poetry work The Kalleva (1835), figuring in a Russian folktale, and elsewhere.


While we know frost is a natural event, it is fun to think that an imaginary creature named Jack Frost (or another name in some other cultures) changed the world into a winter wonderland!


Frost was never born, but he was made from hoarfrost by the love of the human girl, Rose. He was the original Jack Frost. "Because it was her love that made me real....Not faerie, not wild magic, but the magic of love. I thought I was giving up what life I had to save Rose, but the consort had asked if I would give up everything I was, and I did. I became what she needed me to be. When I realized that I would not age with her I wept, because I could not imagine being without her."


Frost is a beautiful assassin. One wintry morning, we wake to a garden silvered with ice, the product of simple chemistry: water vapor forms frost when surface temperatures it comes in contact with are below freezing. Crystalline white replaces autumnal browns and greens. Tree branches glisten. Conifers look as if flocked for Christmas. The swaying inflorescences on ornamental grasses sparkle and shine like diamonds. My children used to vie to be first out the door to crunch their boots across the newly frosted lawn, leaving a trail of footprints. Frost transforms the world, and then melts away as quickly as chocolate on the tongue.


Before modern meteorological forecasts, people predicted weather by careful observation and memories of seasons past, much as gardeners tend to do even today. My mother, who taught me to garden, believed that her naked ladies, aka Belladonna lilies, foretold frost dates. She swore by an old wives tale that first frost hits six weeks from the date these pink lilies drop their blooms.


There are myriad types of frost, their quality and appearance dependent on temperature and the amount of moisture in the air. When the air is dry and the temperature barely freezing, frost can look as ephemeral as the lightest dusting of powdered sugar. At the other extreme is hoarfrost, which on cold, clear nights encrusts surfaces with a thick, white fuzz of feathery ice crystals.


Then there is black frost, glazed frost, ground frost, and air frost. The rapscallion Jack Frost, an elfish creature of English and Scandinavian folktales, was held responsible for fern frost, the patterns etched across windowpanes on cold mornings. When I was little, it was a treat to help my dad scrape the intricate frost patterns off the car windshield. Sometimes the ice lay in fine swirls on the glass; other mornings it was as thick as fur.


Beware especially the frost pocket, which can damage even hardy plants. Because cold air sinks, it tends to pool in low-lying areas, creating spots where frost hits earlier and lingers longer. When a frost is brief, plants can bounce back, but if it lasts several hours or more, it ruptures cell membranes by freezing the moisture inside the leaves and stems. Plants then blacken and seem to melt, or in the case of perennials, die down and go dormant until the warmth of spring coaxes them out of the ground again. 041b061a72


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